Blog feministskoi punk-groupui* Pussy Riot

Screw this. I can’t type in Cyrillic letters on this thingy. Fuck this.

This should probably be sub-titled: “Two Grrrl Riot.” The blog is here – I can only read a little of this, but who cares? Just look at the pictures or something.

There is an article about them in English here, in that bourgeois paper we are not supposed to read. Viva le rock, on International Womenz Day!!

* an effort at correct grammar, probably wrong.

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6 Responses to Blog feministskoi punk-groupui* Pussy Riot

  1. sjmckenzie says:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/02/pussy-riot-protest-russia?fb=native&CMP=FBCNETTXT9038

    This the same thing?

    also – getting your Russian wrong means that you have some Russian to get wrong?

  2. janet5 says:

    Da!

    Yes, same people. I wish I could understand all (any) of the swear words in the anti-Putin song they filmed in the church. It’s indicative, though, of the circumstances they face when Aleksei Navalny (an opposition blogger who, just by virtue of doing that, is pretty brave, but who is kind of a sexist, nationalistic jerk, too) refers to them as “silly girls.” Um, thanks.

    Comrade, I studied Russian back in the 80s. I had already settled into some weird ideological space that is kinda anarchist and kinda social democratic and had given up the idea that the Soviet Union was just the coolest thing EVER. But I liked the idea of studying the language and trying to understand the USSR a lot better. Russian is a tricky language that seems to get harder the more you study it – I gave up after a certain point because I was hopelessly confused and there weren’t a lot of opportunities to practice with real live native speakers. My university had these charmingly (unintentionally) kitschy language videos produced by the Soviets, and there were some old aristocratic families kicking around San Francisco, but that was about it. I was too shy to talk to real people, anyway.

  3. sjmckenzie says:

    I knew quite a few people that had a “Russian literature phase.” All of a sudden in about 1996 everything was all Dostoyevsky this and Nabakov that and they were all travelling to Moscow and coming back looking much fatter, and slightly grey, and telling very long stories involving vodka and snow.

    One guy did try and learn the language, but I think he, too, found no one to practice with and gave up. All the rest of them just read in translation and enthused about the style. I have never really read any Russian stuff myself.

    I tried listening to Pussy Riot and they are kind of all right, very bass heavy. Kroptkin Vodka is kind of a cool name for a song, too.

    http://punkmusic.about.com/od/punkinthenews/a/Never-Mind-The-Kremlin-Heres-Pussy-Riot.htm

  4. janet5 says:

    I never had that phase. Or rather, if I were going to have it, it was killed by the actual effort of trying to learn the language. Somewhere near the end of my second year of Russian, our instructor gave us four pages of Anna Karenina to read – and then two pages’ worth of supplemental vocabulary (plus all the idiomatic phrases that we didn’t know). It was incredibly depressing have studied it for that long and to still feel like a clueless jerk. Whereas the English phrase might look like, “The tree lying in the road blocked the path of the five horsemen,” the Russian phrase is more like, “The lying [verbal adjective form – agrees with the noun ‘tree’]-in-the-road [locative case with respect to the preposition ‘in’]-tree [nominative case] blocked [perfective verbal aspect] the path [accusative case] of the five [genetive plural case] horsemen [genetive plural case of animate objects]. NO WAIT, THAT’S WRONG. FUCK FUCK FUCK.

    You see? Although someone will come along and say, oh, but Korean is soooooo much harder.

    That link to Pussy Riot has a link to an article/video about punks in Banda Aceh. So kick me, I had no idea. They. Are. Awesome. They play ukeleles and the authorities consider them a “social disease,” which sounds smirk-worthy until you realize that they can get their asses kicked (and much, much worse) in a conservative Islamic society. It would be nice if I were a little less parochial sometimes, I guess.

    • janet5 says:

      I like the idea of the “Pussy Riot bus” (and getting all aboard it).

      Apparently, one Orthodox publication in Russia (unironically) tried to translate the band’s name literally and published an article on “Uprising of the Uterus.”

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